Uplifting Glimpses of Truth

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    Comparing version 17:55, 27 Oct 2011 by Pila Mulligan? with version 18:02, 27 Oct 2011 by Pila Mulligan?.

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    Blissful awareness of reality is a state described by Hindu teachings in the phrase sat-chit-ananda (reality-awareness-bliss.)  However, considerAdd the first noble truth of Buddhism , the concept of dukkha, meaning (suffering or dissatisfaction -suffering, dissatisfaction (or a "fundamental unsatisfactoriness of all conditioned existence" in terms used by Stim at the outset of this project), ) and unhappiness –and satchitananda may seem to be a distant, perhaps unattainable notion.  People are generally familiar with the aha-moment, or a situation of grokking to use Heinlein’s term, and the idea of epiphany: in each of those moments one feels an uplifting glimpse of truth.  Are those moments exceptions in mundane life where dukkha is – as Buddha described – a more continual factor?  How is it possible that suffering and dissatisfaction maycontinualfactor?Buddha’s teachings embrace the idea that dukkha is true.  How can suffering, dissatisfaction and unhappiness lead to a blissful awareness of reality?

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    Version from 17:55, 27 Oct 2011

    This revision modified by Pila Mulligan? (Ban)

    ...

    Blissful awareness of reality is a state described by Hindu teachings in the phrase sat-chit-ananda (reality-awareness-bliss.)  Add the first noble truth of Buddhism the concept of dukkha, meaning suffering, dissatisfaction (or a "fundamental unsatisfactoriness of all conditioned existence" in terms used by Stim at the outset of this project) and unhappiness –and satchitananda may seem to be a distant, perhaps unattainable notion.  People are generally familiar with the aha-moment, or a situation of grokking to use Heinlein’s term, and the idea of epiphany: in each of those moments one feels an uplifting glimpse of truth.  Are those moments exceptions in mundane life where dukkha is – as Buddha described – a continual factor?  Buddha’s teachings embrace the idea that dukkha is true.  How can suffering, dissatisfaction and unhappiness lead to a blissful awareness of reality?

    Version as of 18:02, 27 Oct 2011

    This revision modified by Pila Mulligan? (Ban)

    ...

    Blissful awareness of reality is a state described by Hindu teachings in the phrase sat-chit-ananda (reality-awareness-bliss.)  However, consider the first noble truth of Buddhism, the concept of dukkha (suffering or dissatisfaction - a "fundamental unsatisfactoriness of all conditioned existence" in terms used by Stim at the outset of this project), and satchitananda may seem to be a distant, perhaps unattainable notion.  People are generally familiar with the aha-moment, or a situation of grokking to use Heinlein’s term, and the idea of epiphany: in each of those moments one feels an uplifting glimpse of truth.  Are those moments exceptions in mundane life where dukkha is – as Buddha described – a more continual factor?  How is it possible that suffering and dissatisfaction may lead to a blissful awareness of reality?

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